Author Interview

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Name: Russell Pike

Question 1:

Q:  What Kind of Writing do you do?

A:  In a broad sense, I suppose you could call me a Speculative Science-Fiction author.  Speculative Science-Fiction covers any kind of fiction writing that asks ‘what if.’  Most books in this genre take place on fantastic worlds or distant planets and are populated with alien races and mystical beings.

 

Question 2:

Q:  Why did you choose to write in your particular field or genre?  If you write more than once, how do you balance them?

A:  I love the speculative aspects of both science fiction and fantasy.  I love exploring new worlds, alien races, magics and technologies through writing, then asking, how would normal people live in a world like this?  How would this change politics, travel and culture?  The series I’m writing now takes fantastic technology, magic powers, sword play and supernatural creature all tossed together in an exotic world.  It’s a fun mix that takes what I love best about each genre.

 

Question 3:

Q:  Where did your love of reading and writing come from?

A:  I’ve loved reading since I was a small child.  I especially loved the books that took me somewhere new.  I loved feeling like my face was pressed against a car window, staring wide eyed as exotic scenery rolled by.  I still feel like that, but now I’m sitting in the driver’s seat.

 

Question 4:

Q:  How long have you been writing?

A:  I’ve been writing seriously for the last four years.

 

Question 5:

Q:  Can you share some stories about the people you met while researching the book you’re working on?

A:  As a writer, I’ve joined critique groups and attended writer’s conferences.  These are great places to learn and meet other authors like you and your husband.  I’ve had the opportunity to meet some very talented people who aren’t writers themselves.  One of the people I’ve worked most closely with is Bob Beason, the artists who does the illustrations for my series.  You should definitely check out his work on deviant art, he posts as Dr. Strangebob.

 

Question 6:

Q:  What was the hardest part of writing this book?

A:  The hardest part of writing this series was world building.  There’s a lot of new information about our protagonist Kal and his hometown of Arkebis.  However, there’s nothing that chills a narrative quite like a massive information dump or long winded prologue.  I worked hard to weave the back story and new terms into the narrative without slowing down or sounding forced.  In the end, I think I was successful.

 

Question 7:

Q:  Are there vocabulary words or concepts in your book that may be new to people?

A:  Well, since this series takes place in its own unique world, there are some new terms.  For example, people use an energy known as Alch to power everything from flying ships to robotic creatures.  There’s also a supernatural energy known as weiyld that is produced by suns.  At attunweiyld is a person who has been trained to harness weiyld energy to grant himself or herself magical abilities.  Kal is an attunweiyld.  In addition, he works for an organization called the Aleph Association which believes in spreading this knowledge. There’s plenty more, but don’t sweat it.  As I said above, I’ve worked hard to introduce new terms in a way that makes sense.

 

Question 8:

Q:  What do you want you readers to know about you?

A:  I love good stories as much as you do.  I love exploring new worlds and meeting new people through books, it’s why I do this.  When I’m not writing, I’m probably being a massive nerd while discussing my favorite books and TV series or arguing about who would win in a fight between Gandalf and Elminster.  (in case you’re wondering, it’s Elminster.)

 

Question 9:

Q:  Who are some of your favorite authors that you feel were influential in your work?  What impact have they had on your writing?

A:  I love just about (ok, everything) by Jim Butcher, especially his characters like Harry Dresden.  Harry’s a wizard with mighty magic at his command, but he still has trouble paying his rent.  Powerful, interesting but still very relatable.   I took this idea to heart when creating Kal.  Kal lives in an amazing world, sure, but he still has to deal with everyday problems at home and at his job.  He gets behind on his paperwork, he has money trouble, and of course, his relationships aren’t perfect.  Kal has powerful arcane abilities at his command, but his enemies are even stronger so he needs courage and quick thinking to win the day.

I also love the Chronicles of Amber by Roger Zelazny.  He fast paced books can tell an incredible amount of story in a short amount of time without sacrificing plot complexity.  I’ve incorporated that into my own stories, keeping my pacing fast and throwing enough curve balls to keep the plot from bogging down.

 

Question 10:

Q:  Tell us a bit about your series.

A:  The story I’m writing right now is called “Mechanical Dreams.”  It’s the first full story in the “Under the Nine Suns” series.  Our story follows Kalrin Vallis, Kal to his friends.  Kal is an investigator, defender and truth seeker.  Think Sam Spade meets Roland Deschain with a lightning gun and magic powers.  In “Mechanical Dreams” Kal is approached by a broken hearted young man whose fiancé has gone missing.  Kal agrees to help, but the woman had been gone for some time and the situation looks grim.  To make matters worse, a mysterious third party and rogue mechanical horror are stalking the city.  On top of all that, Kal becomes aware of a massive conspiracy deep within his home town of Arkebis.  Kal won’t back down, but he may be dragged into the darkness he seeks to stand against.

You can (and should) check out my writing by following this link http://eepurl.com/b78dxL and signing up for my email list.  When you do, you’ll get a free novelette written about one of Kal’s earlier adventures.  You can also learn more about me and my writing by visiting my website.  http://www.undertheninesuns.com/

Author Interview 9/20/2016

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I’m sorry this is so late. Yesterday got away from me.

Chanelle Volbrecht

Author Interview

Name:

  1. What kind of writing do you do?

I’m currently working in the supernatural/syfy genre.

  1. Why did you choose to write in your particular field or genre?  If you write more than one, how do you balance them?

I was always very imaginative as a child and so fantasy/syfy was always appealing. I have       not yet ventured into other genres, there’s always a possibility.

  1. Where did your love of reading and writing come from?

I always loved books before I could even read, so naturally my love for writing stems from  this.

  1. How long have you been writing?

I started dabbling with it at the age of ten. However, I did not take it too seriously, until my freshman year of high school. (2006).

  1. Can you share some stories about the people you met while researching the book you’re working on?

I have a friend who I’ve known since high school, We were in a writer’s group called Writer’s Ink. Ever since then through social media we’ve kept in touch, and she has been one of my biggest supports.

  1. What was the hardest part of writing this book?

Finishing it, I started in 2006 and just finished the first typed draft this year. I never really had much faith in the book to begin with, and struggled with it a lot.  Yet it never left me alone, so I never gave up on it.

 

Author Interview

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Name: Heather Hayes

  • What kind of writing do you do?

I am a children’s book author. I have two books in print. My picture book is called The Fantastic Backyard of Imagination. It is the story of a brother and sister and their friends using the same tree and backyard to imagine totally different things. It encourages kids to get off the couch and play! I also have a young readers chapter book called Unexpected Magic. It is about a witch who has spent 50 years alone in her cave guarding a magic crystal. Some girls happen upon her, and after some grumpy interactions become her friend.

  • Where did your love of reading and writing come from?

I was never very good at math, so I guess reading and writing has always appealed more to me! I used to write little books and newspapers for my friends and family when I was a child. I’ve always loved reading a good, grabbing story!

 

  • How long have you been writing?

 

I wrote silly little stories as a child and teen. The first time I tried as an adult to write a real book was in 2013. My first edition of Unexpected Magic then came to be. I wrote it to be a Christmas gift for my daughters. I reworked the manuscript to make it a chapter book, and it was published in 2014.

  • Can you share some stories about the people you met while researching the book you’re working on?

 

All of my work so far has not needed much research. It is all fiction for children. I imagined Woodsville and Griselda’s cave for the setting of Unexpected Magic. The five girls in that story are based on my daughters’ personalities and interests. Hannah in The Fantastic Backyard of Imagination is based on me as a child. The adventures and activities of the children in that story come from memories of my childhood.

  • What was the hardest part of writing this book?

 

When you write children’s books, you have to find the perfect balance of writing and pictures. You don’t want to overwhelm your readers with too many words, or words they won’t understand. I end up simplifying my words a lot, which is hard sometimes. The word my grown up mind says is perfect for a situation in my book, might confuse a child, so I have to simplify it.

  • Who are some of your favorite authors that you feel were influential in your work? What impact have they had on your writing?

 

I love all kinds of books. I like Charles Dickens, Jane Austin,  J. K. Rowling, Shannon Hale, Terry Brooks, Janette Oke, Rick Riordan, Stephanie Meyers, Gerald Lund, Lynn Austin, and  L.A. Meyer. I like when these authors surprise me. I like when I can’t help but fall in love with the characters. But most of all, I love happy endings. If I’m going to spend hours of my free time engrossed in a book, I want to feel enlightened, uplifted, or warm and fuzzy when I’m done.

  • What question do you wish that someone would ask about your book, but nobody has? Write the question out and then answer it.

 

Why does Griselda change her name at the end of Unexpected Magic?

Griselda changed her name to Rissy because that was a nickname her  father used to call her. She hated when he called her that as a teenager. She insisted on being called Griselda during that selfish time in her life. Changing her name to Rissy represents Griselda wanting to turn a new leaf.  She desires to surround herself with people who love her again.  That story will come out in the sequel to Unexpected Magic.

  • What were your goals and intentions in this book, and how well do you feel you achieved them?

 

In Unexpected Magic I wanted to tell a grabbing story with a good moral. I wanted people to want to be kinder and be willing to leave their own comfort zone after reading it. I think I did accomplish that.

In The Fantastic Backyard of Imagination I wanted to get kids off their electronics and excited to explore the fun worlds that could come to life in their own backyard. Like I say in that book, “When you have a good imagination, you are never bored.” I watched my kids and nieces and nephews take to the climbing tree in Grandma’s yard after reading my book.  So I think I accomplished my goal for that book as well.

  • What do you think most characterizes your writing?

I think my writing in general is wholesome, uplifting, moderately funny, and leaves you evaluating your own behavior, hopefully wanting to be a little better.

 

10)  What inspires you?

 

My children inspire me all the time. My youngest two are in a really creative, imaginative phase right now and I just love to eavesdrop on their play! Whenever I don’t feel inspired, I usually pick up a book that catches my eye, and something creative in the story inspires me.  On the flip side, when I read a truly uncreative piece of work, I tend to think I can do better, and then the wheels start turning…

Getting to know Local Authors Part 1.

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Oliver P. Samora, Jr.

Author Interview

1) What kind of writing do you do?
I think of my style as detective noir

2) Where did your love of reading and writing come from?

)I have always been an avid reader and I have always wanted to be an author but was not sure if anyone would like my stories
3) How long have you been writing?
I dabbled in writing when I was in high school but stepped away I have been working at this set of books for 20 plus years
4) Can you share some stories about the people you met while researching the book you’re working on? working on my degree as criminal investigating in Hawaii with the Army I worked with some great officers and saw the harsh world of drugs and prostitution, and lots of my female friends helped me with the reactions from the females view in lots of the book

5)What was the hardest part of writing this book? The hardest part has been reaching into my “dark corners” of my mind and put the characters in motion, there is lots of feelings that push my writing and I have put them to a different part of my mind.
6) Who are some of your favorite authors that you feel were influential in your work? What impact have they had on your writing?
I have so many different authors that I read, the main ones for action and drama have been Robert B Parker (R.I.P) who wrote the Spenser series and Jessie stone and a little know writer Carl Ramm who wrote the Hawker series Ed Mcbain and joseph wambaugh for the different police stories and Peter Maas (R.I.P) who wrote the life story of one of my hero’s Serpico also J.C. Pollock
7) What question do you wish that someone would ask about your book, but nobody has? Write the question out and then answer it.
“do you have any life experience as a officer?” “While I have not been a police officer I have worked in security as a prison Guard at 18,and have always wanted to be a officer, I have done some bail recovery ( bounty hunting )”
8) What were your goals and intentions in this book, and how well do you feel you achieved them?
The main goal was to get my dreams down on paper and get my anger and confusion out, and to see if my thoughts would be liked by more than the small circle of friends that knew of the story I feel I have achieved my goal after all this time as I have gotten some great feed back
9) What do you think most characterizes your writing? The main struggle of good and bad, light and dark and the desire to write the wrongs
What inspires you? Music of all styles and the feedback from my friends